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Are all Immortals foundlings?

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  • #26
    That is a very interesting theory. Does it suggest that in areas where a lot of people died (clan wars etc.) occurrence of immortality would be higher?
    May flights of Demons guide you to your final rest...

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    • #27
      Originally posted by Nicholas Ward View Post
      That is a very interesting theory. Does it suggest that in areas where a lot of people died (clan wars etc.) occurrence of immortality would be higher?
      The odds of a foundling being created wouldn't be dependent on the number of dead in an area but rather where the Quickening energy in the earth had come together.

      I imagine Quickening to operate like a magnetic or gravitational force. It is always attracted to itself and pulling towards itself. As more and more of the energy combines, it is able to pull more of it closer which eventually lead to these pools or "sources" of Quickening that can spawn new Immortals. That is also why Immortals can sense each other because the magnetic-like force of the Quickening inside each Immortal starts to pull towards each other, causing that sensation. Also, that would be why the Gathering happens when only a few Immortals remain because they each have a significant portion of the entire Quickening inside each of their bodies. The Quickening would be constantly pulling towards the other pieces, drawing each of them closer and closer to whatever the midpoint of all the remaining Immortals would be. In the original Highlander film, for example, that would have been New York City. It would be like a siren's call that urges them onward to reuniting the Quickening into a whole.

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      • #28
        Oh. Ley lines. Witch ties into the whole celtic/ highlander thing, as far as it meshing with legends as they anciently stand. Nice fit.

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        • #29
          Originally posted by Perfect Warrior View Post
          Oh. Ley lines. Witch ties into the whole celtic/ highlander thing, as far as it meshing with legends as they anciently stand. Nice fit.
          Yes, indeed. The goal was to have it make sense using concepts seen in the show and in the real world rather than make up something completely different and try to force it into the lore.

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          • #30
            Wherever baby immortals come from, I think their origins have to be tied into whoever created the Game and set up the rules. Immortals clearly aren't a natural occurrence. They exist with a specific purpose in mind. So somewhere, baby Immortals are either being birthed or manufactured by some other kind of being that we haven't been introduced to. But whoever they are, they seem to be actively monitoring the rules of the Game, given what happened when Kane tried to take Connor's head on holy ground in Highlander 3. The options, I think, are as follows.

            1) They're Transformed: Using the Methuselah Stone, which works as advertised, the beings creating baby Immortals kidnap human infants and use the stone on them to make them Immortal before leaving them out in the world as Foundlings. In this case, the stone we saw is one which they lost along the way somehow, but not the only one in their possession.

            2) They're Manufactured: Whoever the beings behind the Game are, they simply create Immortals, so in essence they have no parents. They're created from whole cloth the way, I suppose, God created His angels. Manufactured beings, rather than beings which evolved into their current state and reproduce.

            3) They're Birthed: Immortals do have a mother and father, but not human parents, or Immortal parents. Rather, they're the biological children of these other beings who, rather than raise them, decide to exile them and force them into the Game. For that to be the case, though, it'd have to suggest that the Immortals are different from their biological parents and don't possess the same abilities.

            IMO, there can't be any explanation of where baby Immortals come from until the purpose of the existence of Immortals and the Game is first explained.

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            • #31
              I ran into one fanfic where Immortals were designed by a distant alien race on a dying world, as a possible escape hatch, and the final Quickening would be powerful enough to create a portal between the worlds for them to escape and rule Earth. The reason Immortals all appear as foundlings is because they can't send anything bigger. They had a subplot where Methos was the first sent as an adult, and the experience did him such damage that he turned completely against them. Duncan was very specifically engineered to be the person who would bring them through, believing them to be his loving family and parents or something like that.

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              • #32
                I don't buy into the alien theory. There's too much that's magical about them for that to be the case. Both the movies and the series has given us a number of other magical elements, whether it's Nakano's power of illusion, Cassandra's prophesying and mind control, the Methuselah Stone, or Ahriman. Not to mention, why would aliens single out holy ground as inviolable ground for Immortal combat? And if we assume The Final Dimension is still valid to some degree, the creators of the Game seemingly monitor holy ground, as they were ready to lay down the law on that fight between Kane and MacLeod (And the series suggests that the destruction of Pompeii was a result of two Immortals fighting on holy ground).

                I wish I could remember what episode it was in, but there was an episode where MacLeod tells someone a fable he made up on the spot about faeries abandoning their children in the mortal world. I'm thinking that MacLeod's fable is far closer to the actual truth than any other theory out there. There are other beings out there, and they're not space aliens on a far-off planet, but beings far closer to Earth. And, I suspect, they may be very similar in nature to Ahriman.

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                • dubiousbystander
                  dubiousbystander commented
                  Editing a comment
                  That was Bad Day in Building A, and I don't remember anything in that about faeries abandoning human children. Was that a cut bit, or just something they didn't use in the end?
                  DM - Well, they were like regular people, except they lived for... a very long time, and... they never grew old.

                  Belinda - Like Peter Pan!

                  DM - Yeah... sort of. Well, the fairies were handsome... and wise... and very, very clever. The problem was, as time went on, there were more and more people, and soon the fairy people had to leave their home in the fairy city. They moved into the mountains, and into the old forests, and in the caves and in the cliffs. But the other people always found these places, so the fairy people had to move on.

                  Belinda - That's sad. Where do they live now?

                  DM - [whispering] Oh, Belinda... they're all around us. And you know what their job is? [Belinda shakes her head.] It's to protect children. And sometimes tell them stories.

                • dubiousbystander
                  dubiousbystander commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Unless it was something in Season 6...
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